The GenderWorks Blog

Advance Your Career OR Raise a Family: American Women Can Only Pick One

This post originally appeared in Role/Reboot on 

U.S. women’s workforce participation has been on the decline since 1999. According to a recent New York Times story “Why U.S. Women are Leaving Jobs Behind,” Europeans countries—which have expanded family-friendly benefits such as paid parental leaves and protection for part-time workers—have witnessed an increase of mothers with children under 18 in the workforce. Alternately in the U.S., which remains …

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Men at the Harvard Business School: An Unexpected Voice for Redefining Success

This post originally appeared in Huffington Post on 

Something exciting is happening along the Charles River in Boston, Massachusetts. The voice of men at the Harvard Business School — future business leaders of tomorrow — have joined with their female counterparts to support gender equality, including better work-life balance for all. During National Work and Family Month, this is surely cause for celebration. In the fall of 2013, …

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How Much Is Enough?

This post originally appeared in Huffington Post on 

The hustle and bustle of the holiday season seems a perfect time to ask “how much is enough?” It’s a question I ponder frequently, especially as I notice my strong tendency to be planning, organizing, executing — doing, doing, doing. For so many families, too much in key aspects of our lives — work, parenting, consuming — collectively makes us …

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The Gender Connection: A Conversation About the Future of Boys

This post originally appeared in The Good Men Project on 

Between Mark Sherman and Lisa Levey, 10 of the people they love the most are boys and men. The issues of men and boys is critically important to them. They are starting a conversation to try to bridge the gender gap. Mark Sherman, PhD, is an emeritus professor of psychology at SUNY, New Paltz, where his main interest has long …

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An Untold Story: The Work-Life Struggles of Men With Stay-at-Home Wives

This post originally appeared in Huffington Post on 

National Work and Family Month seems a particularly good time to call out a group we rarely associate with work-life struggles, men with stay-at-home wives. It’s easy to conclude that men in traditional families have few limitations on their work availability. There is a deep bias that these men can work very long days, travel often — on short notice …

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Why the ‘Less Ambitious’ Man Is the Secret to Better Work-Life Balance for All

This post originally appeared in Huffington Post on 

Highly ambitious men are generally considered very desirable as both leaders and mates. But recent news out of Harvard Business School and the 10th Anniversary of National Work and Family Month got me thinking about how the “less ambitious” man is the real key to making better work-life balance — and gender equality — a reality. Let me explain. In …

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Pondering the Light and “Dark Side” of How We Work

This post originally appeared in Huffington Post on 

Hunkering down during superstorm Sandy, like so many on the East Coast this week, I kept thinking about how work is quite different from when I entered the professional workforce in the 1980s. As an investment analyst in my early career, I went into the office in the morning, spent the lion’s share of the day at my desk or …

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The Pressure to Have It All and the Need to Redefine Success

This post originally appeared in Huffington Post on 

In 1963 Betty Friedan articulated “the problem with no name” as the pressure women experienced to feel fulfilled only by their roles as wives and mothers. I contend that nearly 50 years later we have a new problem with no name, the pressure to feel fulfilled only by “having it all.” And what does all mean? It is an ambitious …

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Is Marriage Obsolete?

This post originally appeared in Role/Reboot on 

Marriage certainly has its problems but as they say about Democracy, it sure beats the alternatives, according to author Lisa Levey. Matt Richtel’s Sept. 28th New York Times article “Till Death, or 20 Years, Do Us Part” explores the question of whether marriage in its current form has become obsolete. Given the reality that nearly half of all marriages break …

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